Endorsed by :
                                                                          

Preamble:

The advent of multileaf collimators in 90s and the ever increasing access to fast computers laid the foundation for a radical change in the practice of radiation therapy. Advanced technology emerged together with numerous conceptual and technical ramifications in treatment calculation and delivery. Merged with imaging, advanced radiotherapy in developed countries has become much resource-intensive, team-based and complex; nevertheless, it is now the new norm.

Modern treatment technology is inevitably – though not comprehensively– finding its way to the clinics of many developing countries, where the industrial work culture and technical network has not yet flourished as much. In developing countries, especially where private practice is allowed, there is a vibe towards purchasing fancier technologies to get a lead against other radiotherapy centers and potentially attract more patients as a result of selling the prestige of the new technology.

Yet as:
- the technical support is not always adequate,
- the necessity for training and teamwork has not been fully acknowledged,
- the intricacies of the technology is overlooked and,
- the culture of optimizing workflow and considering human factors has not formed well, modern technology may not be used as optimally as in developed countries and may not result in comparable outcomes. When misused, novel technologies can even do more harm than good to patients. This conference aims at bringing professionals together to confer about such issues and suggest ideas to form an atmosphere of debate and discussion for the clinicians, investors, managers and equipment vendors.

Whether you are a radiation oncologist or a clinical medical physicist, a manager or investor, or just an enthusiastic equipment provider who seeks alternative approaches to the market of a developing country, we invite you to participate and contribute to the discussions of this conference, sharing your novel ideas or experiences to pin down major objectives in defining pathways for ameliorating advanced radiotherapy functionality in situations where resources are more limited than a fully developed country.

The conference is programmed by ISCO, in scientific collaboration with ESTRO and benefits from a world-class faculty in the field of radiation oncology. To seek contributions from international community and to set the ground for broader discussions and collaborations the official language of the conference is English. International attendees with an interest in the subject of this conference are welcome. ISCO can help obtaining visas and legal clearances for international participants.

Check your calendars for this event.